Presidential Performance Appraisals (3): Millard Fillmore

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In honor of President’s Day, I thought it’d be fun to take the Performance Appraisal process to the West Wing.
 
Each day this week, I will be discussing the art of communicating performance reviews while applying the theme of my favorite February holiday: President’s Day.

This series of posts will lead you through the performance review process by appraising several US Presidents. Please excuse any anachronistic references and the general impossibility of the task at hand.

Which President would you like to see subjected to Performance Appraisal? And what would you say to them if you were appraising their performance? Please get in touch and let me know!

If you missed Part 1, click here. If you missed Part 2, click here.

Goals of Presidential Performance Appraisals

Prudent employers should always try to recruit and retain two-term Presidents wherever possible, and release those who are considered impeachment risks. In order to achieve these goals, performance appraisals (whether stellar or poor) should be conducted on a regular and timely basis (i.e., perhaps every January 20) and in a fair manner.  As with any paperwork related to personnel actions, performance appraisals should be properly documented.

Appraising Millard Fillmore


Mfillmore.jpeg.jpegConsistently in the bottom 10 percent of his peers in terms of productivity, Millard contributed to a hostile workplace environment by expressing his racially-divisive views on the organization’s expansion initiatives.  Although training was provided and disciplinary measures were taken, Millard consistently opposes Abraham Lincoln (the “Great Emancipator”) and supports Andrew Johnson (the “Grim Presence”), showing a remarkable lack of tact, foresight and leadership ability.

You place him on a Performance Improvement Plan, and schedule a follow-up meeting to discuss his progress. Ultimately, his poor performance and consistently misguided attempts at workplace initiatives (e.g., the “Know-Nothing” movement) contribute to your decision to eliminate his position as Whig. Forever.